Reports
Barbados Submission to the Committee on the Rights of the Child  thumbnail

Barbados Submission to the Committee on the Rights of the Child

  • Published: December 15, 2016
  • Modified: December 15, 2016

The Global Campaign for Equal Nationality Rights(Global Campaign)1 and the Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion(ISI),2 welcome the opportunity to submit additional information for the consideration of the Committee on the Rights of the Child regarding Barbados’ compliance towards every child’s right to acquire a nationality under Article 7 CRC. This submission will focus on the denial of the child’s right to acquire a nationality in violation of Articles 2, 7 and 8 of the CRC, as a result of gender discrimination in the nationality law of Barbados.

Joint Submission on Lebanon to the Committee on the Rights of the Child thumbnail

Joint Submission on Lebanon to the Committee on the Rights of the Child

  • Published: December 12, 2016
  • Modified: December 12, 2016

In this submission, Equality Now, the Committee for the Follow-Up on Women’s Issues (CFUWI), the Lebanese Council to Resist Violence against Woman (LECORVAW), and the Global Campaign for Equal Nationality Rights provide information and highlight concerns about sex discrimination in the law with regard to nationality in Lebanon in order to reform the country's review by the Committee on the Rights of the Child. 

Joint submission on Bahrain to the Human Rights Council of the United Nations thumbnail

Joint submission on Bahrain to the Human Rights Council of the United Nations

  • Published: September 22, 2016
  • Modified: September 22, 2016
In this submission, Equality Now, the Bahrain Women’s Union, and the Global Campaign for Equal Nationality Rights provide information and highlight concerns about sex discrimination in the law with regard to nationality in Bahrain. The submission also includes key recommendations regarding action by the government of Bahrain to better address this area of concern.
Joint Statement on Women & Girls towards the Global Refugee & Migrant Summits thumbnail

Joint Statement on Women & Girls towards the Global Refugee & Migrant Summits

  • Published: September 19, 2016
  • Modified: September 22, 2016
On September 19th and 20th, world leaders gather at the United Nations (UN) for two major summits on the global refugee and migration crisis – the UN Summit for Refugees and Migrants co-chaired by the Governments of Jordan and Ireland and the Leaders’ Summit on Refugees convened by President Obama. This paper outlines recommendations from the under-signed agencies, which have wide-ranging experience in support to people experiencing forced displacement, as well as the specific challenges faced by displaced women and girls. One of the ten recommendations calls on states to reform gender discriminatory nationality laws, recognizing such laws as a leading cause of statelessness; exacerbating the vulnerability of displaced women and their families; and in contravention with international law, which mandates non-discrimination on the basis of sex.
Joint Submission on Nepal to the Human Rights Council of the United Nations thumbnail

Joint Submission on Nepal to the Human Rights Council of the United Nations

  • Published: July 17, 2015
  • Modified: May 16, 2016
The Nepal Civil Society Network of Citizenship Rights, the Global Campaign for Equal Nationality Rights and the Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion submission to the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) in relation to Nepal focuses on the issue of gender discrimination in Nepal’s citizenship law that has a detrimental impact on Nepali women and their families – both men and women. (Submitted for the 23rd Session of the Universal Periodic Review, 2015)
Background Note on Gender Equality, Nationality Laws and Statelessness 2015 thumbnail

Background Note on Gender Equality, Nationality Laws and Statelessness 2015

  • Published: July 17, 2015
  • Modified: May 16, 2016
Nationality laws which do not grant women equality with men in conferring nationality to their children are a cause of statelessness and a concern for UNHCR under its mandate to prevent and reduce statelessness. Sixty years ago, the majority of States did not provide equal rights to women in their nationality laws. This has radically changed for the better since the adoption in 1979 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)1. However, 27 countries continue to deny women equal rights to confer nationality on their chidlren and over 50 countries maintain other forms of gender discrimination in their nationality law, including denying women equal rights to confer nationality to spouses. Today, there is a growing willingness and commitment by States to take action to achieve gender equality in nationality laws.